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Ancient Warfare Podcast

Discussions from Ancient Warfare Magazine. Why did early civilisations fight? Who were their Generals? What was life like for the earliest soldiers? Ancient Warfare Magazine will try and answer these questions. Warfare minus two thousand years.
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Ancient Warfare Podcast
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Now displaying: Page 1
Dec 9, 2022
With the holiday season almost upon us, the Ancient Warfare Magazine team discuss new books released in 2022, old and new documentaries that are now available on streaming services and throw in a couple of audiobook suggestions for good measure!
 
Links (not quite a comprehensive list of all the media mentioned in the show)
Books
Adrienne Mayor, Greek Fire, Poison Arrows, and Scorpion Bombs: Unconventional Warfare in the Ancient World (2022)
Conor Whately, A Sensory History of Ancient Warfare: Reconstructing the Physical Experience of War in the Classical World (2022)
Murray Dahm, Hunnic Warrior vs Late Roman Cavalryman: Attila's Wars AD 440–53 (2022)
Josiah Osgood, Uncommon Wrath: How Caesar and Cato's Deadly Rivalry Destroyed the Roman Republic (2022)
MC Bishop, Roman Plate Armour (2022)
Peter Stothard, Crassus: The First Tycoon (2022)
Raffaele D'Amato, Post-Roman Kingdoms: ‘Dark Ages' Gaul & Britain, AD 450–800 (2023)
Raffaele D'Amato, Roman Army Units in the Eastern Provinces (2): 3rd Century AD (2022)
William Horsted, British Celtic Warrior vs Roman Soldier: Britannia AD 43–105 (2022)
 
Audiobooks
Stephen Fry, Troy: The Siege of Troy Retold
Tony Robinson, Odysseus: The Greatest Hero of them All
 
Film & TV
Barbarians (2020 - )
In search of the Trojan War (1985)
In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great (1998)
On Hannibal's Trail (2010)
Secrets of the Dead (2000 - )
Spartacus (1960)
Scipione l'africano (1937)
 

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Dec 2, 2022

Murray got this question from Jonathan via email 'I read about Caesar bridging of the Rhine, is that how armies bridged rivers after him, following his example, what about before him?'

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Nov 25, 2022

Bill sent Murray this question, 'how long was the Macedonian Sarissa? I've read a lot about 20' and sometimes longer'. 

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Nov 18, 2022

Jonathan sent this question directly to Murray 'What was the standard depth of a hoplite line? I see eight mentioned all the time – were there any others?' 

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Nov 11, 2022

Jasper and Murray are joined by Julien Blurel, the brains behind the Invicta YouTube channel.

In the latest episode, Invicta demonstrates the true size of a Roman legion. This is the first of their new 'true size' series, which aims to bring history to life in 3D using the Unreal Engine.

True Size of the Roman Legion really puts into context the Roman army camp, the Legion on the march and the Roman army order of battle.

You can find it here.

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Nov 4, 2022

Patron of the podcast Seanbob sent in this question for Murray to mull over, 'what is up with foreskin collection? I know Ramses wrote on walls about the stacks of foreskins he collected from the sea peoples, and David bought his wife with foreskins (1 Samuel 18:27). So what is the deal?

Was circumcisions popular in some cultures and not others? Why not the whole penis? What did they do with them after they stacked them? Some sort of trophy? Like a deer rack on your Grandpa's wall? It is one thing to like dicks, it is strange to collect foreskins. What is the deal?'

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Oct 28, 2022

What happened to all the gear and supplies after a big battle? What did people tend to salvage?

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Oct 21, 2022

'Philip II of Macedonia inherited a fragile kingdom under pressure. He absorbed the lessons from his childhood and turned it into a military powerhouse.'

The team discuss the latest issue of the magazine XV.6 Macedonia Rising: The volatile life of King Phillip II.

 

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Oct 14, 2022

How did armies get or store potable water while on campaign? Murray has the answer...

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Oct 7, 2022

Murray, once more on his own, discusses what, in his opinion, is a useful analogy for talking about ancient warfare.

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Sep 30, 2022

Bryan sent us in this question,'what are some documented cases where the victorious/conquering forces held a deep respect for their defeated foe or for the manner in which their foe fought even though they were ultimately defeated?' 

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Sep 23, 2022

Bruce emailed us this question, what do the columns (Trajan, Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius) tell us about the wars depicted? Are they reliable narratives? Narratives at all? 

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Sep 16, 2022

Andrew emailed us this question for Murray to answer, why did generals write back to the senate about what they had done? Was that account trustworthy – and how can we tell?

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Sep 9, 2022

We are between issues of the magazine, but Murray suggested the team discuss who is our favourite military author or ancient source.

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Sep 2, 2022

Patron of the podcast Micius Porcius sent us this question for Murray to answer. During the imperial period, did consuls continue leading armies in war as they had in the Republican period or were legions only led by generals assigned by the Emperor? 

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Aug 26, 2022

In the last episode, Murray answered the first of two questions Doug posed, the second question being a request to explain the battle of Crimisus in 340BC.


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Aug 19, 2022

Murray tackles this question that Doug emailed in, 'what kind of armies, weapons, and tactics were used by Carthage and Syracuse in the fifth and fourth centuries BC?'

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Aug 12, 2022

The Saxon Shore forts get their name from the Notitia Dignitatum and are among the most impressive Roman remains in Britain, but why they were built remains unclear.

The team discuss the latest episode of the Magazine Ancient Warfare XV.5

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Aug 5, 2022

It is a big thanks to Gerrard for emailing Murray this question. Murray tells us about who is his favourite military author, and why.

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Jul 29, 2022

A few months ago, in response to episode AW137, where the team discussed the Greco-Persian war, Maxnet got in touch via Facebook to ask which source was Murray quoting with respect to the Battle of Marathon. Murray explains the sources.


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Jul 8, 2022

It is the 1,900th anniversary of the building of Hadrian's Wall, that is if it was begun in AD 122 and not AD 119. Not only is there doubt over the year construction was started on the wall, but we also are not completely sure what its function was. As such, a good topic for the team to discuss.

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Jul 1, 2022

Rich posed this question for Murray, 'we have a relatively good picture of what the Roman Legionary weapons and materiel manufacturing process looked like (at least for some time periods).

Do we have any similar information for the Philippian/Alexandrian Macedonian army? That's a lot of 16-foot-long sarissa shafts and spear points to manufacture, and I'm curious what we know about it'.

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Jun 24, 2022

Patron of the podcast Chris writes, 'we are told right before the great Illyrian revolt of AD 6-9, the Romans were preparing a campaign against king Maroboduus and the Marcomanni. It is said he had an army of 74,000 (70,000 infantry and 4,000 Cavalry). What do you guys think the outcome would have been of that war/campaign; would he have stood a chance resisting the roman campaign?'

Murray gives us his opinion.

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