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Ancient Warfare Podcast

Discussions from Ancient Warfare Magazine. Why did early civilisations fight? Who were their Generals? What was life like for the earliest soldiers? Ancient Warfare Magazine will try and answer these questions. Warfare minus two thousand years.
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Now displaying: Page 1
Apr 16, 2021

'The second half of the third century AD saw Rome's military leadership embroiled in a deadly power struggle. Meanwhile, on the empire's frontiers, trouble was brewing...'

The Ancient Warfare team discuss issue XIV.5 of Ancient Warfare magazine.

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Apr 9, 2021

Murray tackles this question from Juan; It seems that Phillip/Alexander’s army was almost invincible but afterwards “Macedonian” style armies seem to be a lot more hit and miss (vs. Romans, Indians, Parthians, Celts etc.). Was this because Philip/Alexander’s troops were uniquely competent/trained or were the commanders after Alexander just not as good? I’m mostly thinking about the pike phalanx but if there’s any information on the light infantry or cavalry troops I’d love to learn!

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Apr 2, 2021

Jasper answers this question from Dag, what's the latest vote on Caesar? A ruthless man who butchered and enslaved women and children for his personal benefit or a saviour in terms of combating and changing a corrupt oligarchy?

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Mar 26, 2021

Murray on his own this week, he takes a question from patron 'Celtic Ace' who asks how did the phalanx come about?

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Mar 19, 2021

The battle of Cannae was a catastrophic defeat for the Romans, but where did these legionaries come from? Jasper tells us where.

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Mar 12, 2021

In this episode, Jasper and Murray are joined by Dr Nicolas Wiater and Dr Alice König who lead the Visualising War project at St Andrews University.

"War is a topic of perennial importance to people from all sectors of all societies, and battle narratives play a major role – in many different forms – in shaping and mediating responses to war. Think of Homer’s Iliad, the histories of Livy, the Bayeux Tapestry, Shakespeare’s history plays, Tolstoy’s War and Peace, Picasso’s Guernica, Shostakovich’s Stalingrad Symphony and Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now – to name just a few. At first glance these representations of battle are all strikingly different. Whether we are conscious of it or not, however, they have long been interacting with each other – in different ways, and to different extents – in artists’, authors’, viewers’ and listeners’ minds, adjusting the ways in which war is visualised and canonising broader ideas about (e.g.) gender, leadership, ‘success’ and sacrifice’.

The aim of the project is to foreground these interactions and explore their impacts. In a nutshell, we ask: how do battles narratives from different media, communities and historical periods both shape and differentiate themselves from each other? How do their interactions reflect and shape broader attitudes to war? And how do the attitudes and ideologies which they generate influence the ways in which people think, feel and behave in their day-to-day lives?"

Mar 5, 2021

If cavalry attacked a Macedonian phalanx how did it react? Did the phalanx have a tactic to hold them off? Murray explains..

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Feb 26, 2021

If a roman legionary camp was attacked, how fast could it react? Jasper gives us his opinion.

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Feb 19, 2021

Murray tells us about the development of the Macedonian phalanx.

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Feb 12, 2021

In the late sixth-century BC, it became clear that the expanding Persian Empire and the Greek city states in Asia and the Aegean would soon come into conflict...

The Ancient Warfare Magazine team discuss the latest issue of the magazine XIV.4, The Greco-Persian Wars.

For those who are not already patrons of the podcast, we've updated the tiers. We've also added subscription to the magazine. You can find out more at patreon.com/ancientwarfarepodcast.

https://www.patreon.com/ancientwarfarepodcast

Feb 5, 2021

Was there etiquette to starting a battle, or did they just happen? Murray investigates.

Jan 29, 2021

What were borders like in the ancient world? Were there hard borders which stopped imperial expansion? Jasper gives us his opinion.

Jan 22, 2021

Were the Theban Sacred Band trained to target officers? Murray gives us the answer.

Jan 15, 2021

In this episode the Ancient Warfare team are between issues of the magazine, so Mark suggested they discuss coups in the ancient world.

For those who are not already patrons of the podcast, we've updated the tiers. We've added subscription to the magazine. You can find out more at patreon.com/ancientwarfarepodcast.

Jan 8, 2021

Jasper explains how the Praetorian Guard became such a powerful force.

Jan 1, 2021

Hugo watching on youtube writes, “it's said that Hannibal took armour and weapons from the dead Romans so he must have used tactics without the phalanx. Do you agree?"

Murray gives his opinion.


Don't forget by signing up as a patron, you can choose to subscribe to the magazine at the same time!

Dec 25, 2020

What do you want to know about Roman Wedges? Murray has the answers.

Don't forget by signing up as a patron, you can choose to subscribe to the magazine at the same time!

Dec 18, 2020

How did armies store their money? Jasper has the answers...

Don't forget by signing up as a patron, you can choose to subscribe to the magazine at the same time!

Dec 11, 2020

A sturdy set of walls is a powerful deterrent: that's why ancient empires devoted so much time to understanding how to best build (and break down) these defensive structures.

The team discuss the vol.XIV-3 of the magazineBreaking Down the Walls: Fortifications and Siege Warfare.

 

Dec 4, 2020

Jasper tells us about last stands in the ancient world.

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Nov 27, 2020

Jasper tells us about the aftermath of a battle, what was it like for wounded or vanquished soldiers? What happened to the dead?

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Nov 20, 2020

Murray ponders this query from Michael watching on youtube, 'maybe a side note to this is to draw parallels with the Celtic invasions of Greece and how they fought the phalanx? Or what Hannibal learnt from his Spanish war, and how he applied that against the legions.'

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Nov 13, 2020

'Torn between the mighty empire that raised him and his own tribal people, a Roman officer's conflicted allegiances lead to an epic historical clash'

The Ancient Warfare magazine team are joined by Joanne Ball from Liverpool University to discuss the new Netflix hit series Barbarians. The action takes place in Magna Germania in 9 AD, with events culminating in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest.

Nov 6, 2020

J.Soth listening via youtube asks, 'How were cataphracts, Thessalian cavalry and companion cavalry etc able to use shock tactics without spurs and other knightly equipment?'

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Oct 30, 2020

Murray gets to grips with Austin's question when he asks 'Achaemenid Persian Immortals, what do we know about them, how did they fight, how where they used etc'.

If you have any questions email Jasper at editor@ancient-warfare.com

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